INTRODUCTORY COURSES

ART 101 (FALL) INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY I

A survey of visual culture from prehistoric through the Middle Ages. The course is designed as an introduction to basic problems and terminology of art history, and to methods of analyzing and interpreting individual works of art. Emphasis is placed upon historical and cultural contexts, and upon the development of major styles. Recommended for first-year students and sophomores who are considering art as a major; open to all students.

ART 102 (SPRING) INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY II

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the present. The course is organized like ART 101. It is an introduction to basic problems and terminology of art history, and to methods of analyzing and interpreting individual works of art. Emphasis is placed upon historical and cultural contexts, and upon the development of major styles. Recommended for first-year students and sophomores who are considering art as a major; open to all students.
Recommended for first-year students and sophomores who are considering art as a major.
Open to all students.

CL 101 SURVEY OF EUROPEAN LITERATURE I

(1/2 course credit toward the minor)
Study of the most significant figures and their works in European literary history, exclusive of English. The course aims to acquaint students with the classics in the literatures of Greece, Rome, Italy, Spain, France, Germany, Russia, and other countries in English translation. No knowledge of foreign languages required. Open to all students. Lecture. [H, V, W]  Instructor: Duhl
No knowledge of foreign languages required.  Open to all students.  

ENG 135 THE RISE OF INDIVIDUALISM

Did modern people “invent” the idea of the self, or does selfhood have a history? This course offers an introduction to English Literature from the late Middle Ages through the eighteenth century, with a particular focus on how this literature represents subjectivity. We’ll aim to see how different genres—including epic, romance, sonnet, tragedy, and the novel—depict the contours of private experience. And we’ll explore possible connections between the varieties of selfhood represented in these early texts and our own ideas about what it means to be an individual. [H, V]

HIST 122 EUROPEAN RACE-MAKING: FROM COLUMBUS TO ABOLITION

This course explores the development of race and racism in Europe, 1492-1807, by following things as they moved around the world. In this period of increased global contact, explorers, merchants, consumers, and enslaved people used material objects to create or challenge racial inequalities. Students will conduct their own research on the relationship between race and two early modern objects or images and will contribute their findings to an online exhibit. [W SS GM1 GM2] Instructor: Foroughi

HIST 123 MAGIC & MIRACLES: MEDIEVAL RELIGION

Religion was central to nearly every aspect of life in the middle ages, c. 500-1500 AD. Using a range of visual and written evidence, students will explore the diversity of Christian, Muslim, and Jewish religious cultures in medieval Europe; examine how Christian leaders used religion to create categories of “self” and “other”; and analyze the relationship between religion and other aspects of identity. They will write two research papers and produce a short podcast. [W SS GM1 V] Instructor: Foroughi

REL 104 SAINTS, MYSTICS, ECSTATICS

(1/2 course credit toward minor)
This course introduces students to the historical and comparative study of religion through examining three often interrelated types of religious personality: saint, mystic, ecstatic. After considering classic and recent studies of these types from both Western and Eastern perspectives, we analyze autobiographical, hagiographic, iconographic, and cinematic portrayals of representative figures, focusing upon the expression of the figures’ defining religious experience, and the responses to their lives and experiences by their followers and communities. Exemplary figures to be considered include (but are not limited to) Rumi, Teresa of Avila, Julian of Norwich, Baal Shem Tov, Carlos Castaneda, and Mama Lola.[GM1, H] Instructor: E. Ziolkowski

 

INTERMEDIATE COURSES

ART 216 BYZANTINE ART

An exploration of the art and architecture of Eastern Europe, Balkan, Asian, and Mediterranean countries during the period of Byzantine rule (343-1453 CE). Works of architecture, sculpture, and painting as well as illuminated manuscripts, icons, and liturgical objects are examined in terms of both their iconography and style. Their significance within the historical, social, religious, and economic context in which they were produced is explored. [W]

ART 222 MEDIEVAL ART

An analysis of major works of art and architecture from the Early Christian period to the Late Gothic era. Concentration is extended beyond the traditional art forms of painting, sculpture, and architecture to include those specific to the Middle Ages: manuscript illumination, ivory carving, stained glass, and tapestries. [W]
Prerequisite: Art 101 or 102, or permission of instructor.

ART 223 ITALIAN RENAISSANCE ART

A study of the art and architecture of Florence, Rome, Siena, and environs from the late thirteenth to the late fifteenth centuries. The works are analyzed in terms of style, technique, function, and patronage. [W]
Prerequisite: Art 101 or 102, or permission of instructor.
Offered: Fall semester, alternate years

ART 224 BAROQUE ART

A study of seventeenth-century European painting, sculpture, and architecture, focusing on the most important masters of the day: Caravaggio, Bernini, Poussin, Rembrandt, and Rubens. The works are analyzed in terms of style, technique, function, and patronage. [W]
Prerequisite: Art 101 or 102, or permission of instructor.

ART 226 AGE OF MICHELANGELO

A study of sixteenth-century painting, sculpture, and architecture, focusing on the most transcendent artists of the age: Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, and Titian. [W]
Prerequisite: Art 101 or 102, or permission of instructor.

ENG 206 ENGLISH RENAISSANCE, HARLEM RENAISSANCE

This course brings together distinctive, important periods that are typically not studied together, raising the immediate question: why? The answers to this radical concept lead us to rethink the processes by which we arrive at “great works,” and, at the same time, tell a revealing story of genre, gender, authorship, race and sexuality that culminates in the twentieth century during the Harlem Renaissance. Does literature have a history? More than mere chronology, “Literary History” asks that as shrewd readers we master the politics of canon formation. [H] Instructor: Staff Prerequisite: Any introductory English literature course (101-150, 152-199) or AP credit, or permission of instructor.

ENG 206 MEDIEVAL-ISH: THE IDEA OF THE MIDDLE AGES

The problem with defining the Middle Ages, as one scholar drily notes, is that everyone sees in them what they want: “The Renaissance invented the Middle Ages in order to define itself; the Enlightenment perpetuated them in order to admire itself; and the Romantics revived them in order to escape themselves.” The upside of this problem of definition is that one can learn a lot about how a given period saw itself by looking at its idea of the Middle Ages. This course takes some foundational medieval and early-modern texts—Beowulf, Hamlet, and tales of King Arthur—and asks how later periods made these stories their own. We’ll find that Hamlet, for instance, draws on much earlier medieval ghost stories even as Shakespeare’s play itself continues to haunt the Gothic imagination centuries later. Our goal will be to explore how the idea of the Middle Ages helped give rise to the very notion of a literary tradition in English. And since we are still imagining the Middle Ages now—from Game of Thrones to the fantasy writing of Kazuo Ishiguro—we will end the course by asking what our ideas of the Middle Ages might say about us. [H]  Instructor: Staff Prerequisite: Any introductory English literature course (101-150, 152-199) or AP credit, or permission of instructor.

ENG 210 ENGLISH LITERATURE I

This course offers an introduction to English Literature from the Middle Ages through the seventeenth century. Particular attention will be given to comparing and contrasting different genres of literature, including, epic, romance, sonnet, tragedy, and the novel. We will also discuss the competing ways in which early modern texts construct gender and represent the individual’s relationship to nature and God. Normally closed to seniors. [H] Instructor: Staff

HIST 207 MIDDLE EAST HISTORY, 600-1200: The Islamic Enterprise

This course studies the Middle East from the 7th century through the early thirteenth. The goal of the course is to provide a survey of the political, social, and cultural movements of this region over the course of six hundred years. Questions that frame the course include: How did the political/social culture of Islam develop? What were the reactions to it? How did the expansion of new linguistic and cultural groups into areas of the Middle East affect the region? [GM2, SS, W] Instructor: Goshgarian

HIST 208 THE MIDDLE EAST (1200-1700): ARABS, CRUSADERS, MONGOLS, TURKS AND MORE

This course studies the Middle East from the 13th through the 17th century. The goal of the course is to provide a survey of the political, social and cultural movements of this region over the course of five hundred years. This course will offer students an opportunity to learn a great deal about Islam, the fall and development of empires, and the importance of urban and social history. [SS] Instructor: Goshgarian

HIST 209 (1700-2003): EMPIRES, NATIONS, “EAST” AND “WEST”

(course counts as 1/2 credit toward the minor)

This course studies the Middle East from the 18th through early 20th century. The goal of the course is to provide a survey of the political, social and cultural movements of this region over the course of three hundred years. How do we define the Middle East? What role did Europe play in the early modern Middle East? What did “modernizing” leaders aim to do in Egypt, Iran and Turkey? What roles has the U.S. played in the Middle East since WWI? [SS] Goshgarian

HIST 213 PRE-COLONIAL AFRICAN HISTORY: HUMAN ORIGINS THROUGH THE ATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE

This course explores the rich and varied civilizations and cultures in Africa, as well as how elements of these cultures have been carried throughout the world. We begin with human origins on the continent and examine African kingdoms, trade, and technology before the era of Atlantic trade. We look at the origins of scientific racism and debates about African participation in and resistance to slaving. This course provides a survey of the major social, economic, religious, and political movements in Africa through the era of the Atlantic slave trade.[GM2] Instructor: Staff

HIST 221 ROME TO RENAISSANCE: MEDIEVAL EUROPE

This course explores the history of Europe, c. 300-1500. Students will examine how events such as the decline of the Roman Empire, Viking invasions, and the Black Death changed everyday life, with a focus on the experiences of peasants, women, and religious and ethnic “others.” They will analyze a range of primary sources, including memoirs, miracle stories, and tax records; dissect recent scholarly debates; and construct original historical arguments based on medieval texts. [SS GM1] Instructor: Foroughi

HIST 222 REFORMATION TO REVOLUTION: EARLY MODERN EUROPE

During the early modern period, c. 1500-1800, European exploration and colonization transformed the ecology of planet Earth and created a new global economy. Religious wars and economic revolutions within Europe, meanwhile, changed the lives of people across the social hierarchy. Through class discussion and two research papers, students will closely analyze a range of primary sources in order to reveal how these developments created or ameliorated inequalities within and outside of Europe. [SS GM1 GM2] Instructor: Foroughi

HIST 225 THE AGE OF REVOLUTION

The course centers on the French Revolution, beginning with an examination of its 18th-century social, economic, and intellectual roots, continuing with the Revolution itself, and ending with an assessment of its aftermath up to 1848. An underlying theme of the course is the connection between the Industrial Revolution and the political revolutions of 1789, 1830, and 1848. [SS]  Instructor: Staff

HIST 232 THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND CIVIL WAR: A POLITICAL HISTORY

(1/2 course credit toward minor)

This course examines American political history in two crucial time periods: 1760-1789 and 1850-1880. The course provides students with a broad base of knowledge about the American Revolution and the Civil War, an understanding of how developments during the two eras defined the American political structure, and an awareness of the place of the American Revolution and the Civil War in historical memory. [SS, W] Instructor: Rosen

HIST 245 LATIN AMERICA: THE COLONIAL TIME PERIOD

This course examines the colonial era of a region now called Latin America. It will begin with the period preceding the arrival of Christopher Columbus and end with the early nineteenth-century wars of independence. Focusing on the interactions between Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans, we will explore the evolution of a number of multiethnic societies. We will consider how colonialism survived for three hundred years, why the system collapsed, and what legacies it left behind.[GM2, SS] Instructor: Pite

HIST 248 EAST ASIA’S LAST DYNASTIES: JAPAN, KOREA, AND CHINA, 1600-1900

A comparative study of institution-building, economic life, and social history in China, Korea and Japan from 1600 to 1900. Themes include: impact of economic growth and urbanization on agrarian societies; the transition from empire to nation-state; and the interactions of China, Japan, and the Western powers on the eve of dynastic collapse. [GM2, SS] Instructor: Barclay

MUS 261-9 SELECTED STUDIES IN MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE

Possible topics include the historical development and the repertoire of an era or school” (e.g. the Baroque Era French Music Music in the United States the History of Jazz). These courses typically investigate the master works and lives of the principal composers of the era as well as the social and musical concepts that influenced the period. Classes involve student presentations field trips and live and videotaped performances as well as sound recordings. Descriptions of current offerings are available through the department office and the Registrar’s Office. Assigned listening. Lecture/laboratory..
Prerequisite: Music 101 or 102 and other courses as appropriate to the topic.

PHIL 216 MODERN PHILOSOPHY

A critical survey of European philosophy from 1600 to 1800, a period during which enormously influential contributions were made to the philosophical study of knowledge, reality, and the nature and limits of philosophy itself. Philosophers to be studied include Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. At least one prior course in philosophy is strongly recommended.[H] Instructor: O. McLeod
Offered: Spring semester only

REL 202 CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURES

An introduction to early Christianity with special attention to its Judaic context, the life and teachings of Jesus, the letters of Paul, the rise and expansion of the Christian community. [H,V] Instructor: E.Ziolkowski

REL 207 THE QUR’AN

A study of the Qur’an that focuses on the origin and compilation of the text, a sociocultural history of its interpretation, and its function in Muslim life. The course also examines the Qur’an as scripture and its major themes.[H,V] Instructor: Y. Patel

REL 214 CHRISTIANITY

This course examines the origins, historical development, and global spread of the main branches of the Christian religion: Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, Protestant denominations. We focus upon the types of religious experience that produced and sustained these traditions, and the various forms through which the traditions have expressed themselves from the time of Jesus to the present: theoretical (beliefs, doctrines, popular legends), practical (rituals, sacraments, usage of art, music, and symbols); and sociological (communion, institutions, types of leadership). Together with surveying the representative historical figures and formative periods of the Christian traditions, we will consider the beliefs and practices regarding such matters as human life, social justice, and the relation of the Christian faith to the state and to other religious traditions, particularly Judaism and Islam.[GM2, H, V]  Instructor: E. Ziolkowski

REL 215 ISLAM: HISTORY, FAITH, AND PRACTICE

A study of the origin and growth of Islam as a religious, cultural, and political force in the world. Beginning with the founding by the Prophet Muhammad in the early seventh century, the course presents a detailed explanation of the Qur’an, as well as the core of beliefs and obligations. The course also explores the content and practical application of the Sharia, Islam’s holy law; the differences between the Sunni and Shiite forms in their historical,  theological, and sociopolitical perspectives; and Islam’s strength and influence in the contemporary world. [H,V] Instructor: Y. Patel

 

UPPER-LEVEL COURSES

ART 340 SEMINAR IN ART HISTORY

(1/2 course credit toward minor)
A study of particular periods, movements, and artists that relates theoretical, historical, and formal approaches, such as protest art, abstract expressionism, Picasso studies, installation and video art and 15th-century Italian painting. Topics vary according to the specialty of the professor. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed Art 101 and 102 and at least two intermediate-level art history courses.

Offered: Spring semester. Will count toward minor only in those semesters when taught by a professor focusing at least in part on 15th-century Italian painting

ART 440 SEMINAR IN ART HISTORY

(1/2 course credit toward minor)
A study of particular periods, movements, and artists that relates theoretical, historical, and formal approaches, such as protest art, abstract expressionism, Picasso studies, installation and video art and 15th-century Italian painting. Topics vary according to the specialty of the professor. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed Art 101 and 102 and at least two intermediate-level art history courses.
Offered: Spring semester. Will count toward minor only in those semesters when taught by a professor focusing at least in part on 15th-century Italian painting

ENG 300 CHAUCER

Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (c. 1386-1400) dramatizes the story-telling competition among a group of travelers thrown together by chance. As the contest evolves from a way of passing the time into a wide- ranging and sometimes heated debate, the question of how we should engage with fictional narratives— whether to laugh, shudder, get mad, get even, or break down in tears—takes center stage in a poem that asks us to think about the ultimate value of the stories we tell each other. We will read (almost) all the tales—from romances and animal fables to tales of seduction and trickery—along with Chaucer’s great love poem, Troilus and Criseyde, and a selection of his other verse. We’ll explore these stories both for themselves and for what they might tell us about Chaucer’s evolving sense of himself as a writer doing something unprecedented. Readings are in the Middle English of Chaucer’s day, but no prior experience is assumed. [H, W] This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major. Prerequisite: ENG 205 or permission of the instructor. [H,W] Instructor: Staff

ENG 301 SHAKESPEARE

This course will provide an introduction to Shakespeare’s plays and non-dramatic works in the context of early modern history and culture, including consideration of staging conventions. [W] Instructor: Staff Prerequisite: English 205 and a literary history course (English 206, 207, 210, 211, 212, or 213), or permission of the instructor. 

ENG 334 STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE

What if genre, rather than being just a set of conventions, could be viewed in terms of its real effects on us—its direct bodily and emotional consequences? We do this with some genres automatically; think of horror movies, for instance, or of the difference between comedy and tragedy as the difference between laughing and crying. Medieval people thought a great deal about this “affective” dimensions of the stories they told, which they said evoked pity (compassio), wonder (admiratio), “lust, ”drede,” and a host of other emotions. This course introduces you to medieval literature, mostly in English, by asking you to think about the emotional stakes of reading different kinds of medieval stories, including passion plays, humorous tales, saints’ lives, romances, and mystical writing. As we’re exploring the diversity of this literature, we’ll also ask some basic questions about the nature of emotions, what they are exactly, and whether they are “anthropological constants” or to some degree conditioned by historical experience. To that end, we’ll engage with recent arguments for the view that people of different cultures don’t just think and believe but potentially even feel differently. [H, W] Instructor: Staff Prerequisite: English 205 or permission of instructor.

ENG 335 STUDIES IN RENAISSANCE LITERATURE

The Renaissance is commonly regarded as the height of Western aesthetic achievement. This course looks at and problematizes the rebirth of knowledge by examining early modern English literature and culture, with attention to the effects of humanism, discovery, class, race, the Reformation, a female monarch, and civil war. Topics vary and are announced during registration. [W] Instructor: Staff Prerequisite: English 205 and a literary history course (English 206, 207, 210, 211, 212, or 213), or permission of the instructor.

ENG 336 STUDIES IN SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE

The seventeenth century saw unprecedented growth and change in England: the decline of absolute government and the rise of liberalism and capitalism, the scientific revolution, colonial expansion, and the rise of modern consciousness and subjectivity. This course explores the ways in which the literature of the period reflects English culture in transition and the ways in which formal literary genres change as the century unfolds. Topics vary. [W] Instructor: Staff Prerequisite: English 205 and a literary history course (English 206, 207, 210, 211, 212, or 213), or permission of the instructor.

ENG 337 MILTON 

“I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary.” These famous lines from Areopagitica (1644) were written by John Milton, not only one of England’s greatest national poets, but also a profoundly influential theologian, philosopher and revolutionary apologist for the execution of England’s King, Charles I, in 1649. In this course we will read Paradise Lost in its entirety and selections from Milton’s prose and other poetry, focusing not only on literary themes, style and genre, but also on the place of Milton’s writings in the history of religious and political thought. We will devote considerable attention to Milton’s radicalism, including both his theological “heresies” and left-leaning political sympathies. With regard to Paradise Lost, we will consider Milton’s unique conception of the creation narrative and the “characters” of Adam and Eve, Christ, God, and arguably Milton’s most magnificent creation, Satan. Was Milton, as William Blake provocatively asserted, “of the devil’s party without knowing it?” Why does Milton depict Adam and Eve as hard laborers in so-called Paradise? In raising and attempting to answer these questions, we will spend considerable time reading secondary criticism on Milton’s theological and philosophical viewpoints. [H, V, W] Instructor: Cefalu  Prerequisite: ENG 205 or permission of the instructor.

ENG 338 METAPHYSICAL POETRY

Metaphysical poems are witty, cerebral poems that use elaborate metaphors or “conceits” to comment on a range of elusive “big topics” including the nature of love, death, evil, and God. Form, style, and imagery are considered as well as the historical contexts in which this poetry emerged in England. Students are introduced to a range of 17th-century poets including John Donne, George Herbert, and Richard Crashaw, as well as the work of later poets influenced by seventeenth-century poetry. [W] Instructor: Staff   Prerequisite: English 205 and 210, or permission of the instructor.

ENG 377 WHAT’S HAPPENING IN EARLY MODERN STUDIES

The early-modern period—the era of Shakespeare and his contemporaries—was a time of dramatic advancement in overseas trade, technology, and a growing economy. We continue to live with the consequences of this moment of historic transformation: globalization, nationalism, the class system, the rise of secular culture, colonization, and the emergence of race as a category of identity and power. Literary studies in this canonical period is rich, diverse, and constantly growing. This course focuses on the various critical and theoretical developments that inform the current work in early-modern studies and engages students in the contemporary debates that drive and shape the field. Playwrights for consideration include: Shakespeare, Middleton, Webster, and Beaumont and Fletcher. [W] Instructor: Staff Prerequisite: English 205 and a literary history course (English 206, 207, 210, 211, 212, or 213), or permission of the instructor.

 

FREN 321 HIGH AND POPULAR CULTURE IN MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE FRANCE

Introduction to the study of medieval and Renaissance French literature and civilization. Readings from such works as Tristan et IseultLa Farce de Maître Pathelin, Rabelais’s Gargantua et Pantagruel, Marguerite de Navarre’s Heptaméron, the poetry of the Pléiade, and Montaigne’s Essais. [H] Instructor: O. A. Duhl
Prerequisite: French 211, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor.

FREN 322 REASON, WIT, AND WILD IMAGININGS: SEVENTEENTH- AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION

An exploration of French society and culture during the Ancien Régime with selected readings from Corneille, Racine, Molière, Mme de Lafayette, Diderot, Voltaire, and Rousseau. Instructors: [H] M. Perrot; Instructor: A. de Saussure.  Prerequisite: French 211, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor.

FREN 421 THE SWORD, THE ROSE, AND THE PEN: CONSTRUCTING IDENTITY IN FRENCH MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE LITERATURE AND CULTURE

This course examines themes and techniques of imitation and/or subversion of classical and Biblical sources as strategies for defining the self and the creative process in the vernacular. Readings include such genres as the epic, courtly romance, popular theater, allegorical and lyric poetry, short story, and the essay (La Chanson de Roland, Chrétien de Troyes, Le Roman de la Rose, François Villon, Christine de Pizan, François Rabelais, Joachim du Bellay, Pierre de Ronsard, Louise Labé, Marguerite de Navarre, Michel de Montaigne). [W] Instructor: O. A. Duhl. Prerequisite: A 300-level French course, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor.

FREN 422 THE AGE OF ABSOLUTISM

A study of representative classical authors of the seventeenth century and their works, with emphasis on Corneille, Molière, Mme de La Fayette, Pascal, Descartes, La Fontaine, La Rochefoucauld, Malherbe, Théophile, and Racine. [W]  Instructor: M. Perrot.  Prerequisite: A 300-level French course, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor.

FREN 441 JUNIOR/SENIOR SEMINAR

(1/2 credit toward the minor)
Offered every year, topics vary and may include the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and early-modern period; description provided under each semester’s course list [W].

GERM 321 A JOURNEY THROUGH GERMAN CULTURE HISTORY: TEXTS AND CONTEXTS BEFORE 1750

This course chronologically traces the development of forms of artistic expression in German literature, respectively within each new historical, cultural, and sociopolitical framework. Representative readings from the beginnings of German literary writings in the seventh century through the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Baroque, to the Age of Enlightenment. Discussion of intellectual and philosophical movements.

HIST 359 SEMINAR IN EARLY AMERICAN HISTORY

The Seminar in Early American History is a research seminar focusing on a special topic, “Abolitionist and Civil Rights Movements in Early American History.” We will examine the strategies, tactics, and rhetoric used by early American activists who sought to abolish slavery, eliminate racial discrimination in criminal law and process, establish legal protections against racial violence, and obtain fundamental rights for African Americans. Assigned readings early in the semester will provide a broad foundation of knowledge about the topic from the perspectives of social, political, legal, religious, cultural, literary, and media history. The rest of the course will be devoted to researching and writing a substantial research paper. The assignments are designed to help you deepen your knowledge of early American history, learn about the history of movements for social change, improve your ability to read critically and think historically, acquire expertise in analyzing primary sources, and strengthen your research and writing skills. No prerequisites. [W]  Instructor: Rosen

INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSES

INDS 361 THE GOTHIC CATHEDRAL: STRUCTURAL RATIONALISM

Gothic cathedrals are considered as representing the physical embodiment of the values of medieval society. The course explores the dependence of their construction on medieval developments in construction technology and the essential interdependence of societal values and technological progress. It also considers how the structural rationalism of Gothic architecture, as interpreted during the nineteenth century, is the foundation for much of modern architectural theory. [W]

REL 301 PHILOSOPHIES OF RELIGION

(1/2 course credit toward minor)
This course examines central problems and current issues in the philosophy of religion as treated in classic texts of the field: definitions of religion; ‘proofs’ of God’s existence; the question of the validity of religious experience, faith, revelation, and miracle; the problem of evil; human destiny; religious naturalism; religious language; atheism and unbelief; religious pluralism; religion and gender. An emphasis in class is placed on discussing these subjects from a rational, critical, objective perspective. [W]

REL 307 THE JEWISH EXPERIENCE IN POLAND

The course traces the development of Jewish civilization in Poland, the spiritual and demographic heart of Judaism, examining distinctive Jewish movements and institutions and the flowering of secular Jewish culture in the early 20th century. The course also considers the controversial issue of Jewish-Polish relations before, during, and after World War II and the Holocaust. Finally, it confronts the surprising rebirth of a Jewish community in Poland since 1989 and the readmission of Jews and Judaism into Polish collective memory through popular media, memorials, museums, and culture festivals. [W] Instructor: Carr

SPAN 303 SPANISH CIVILIZATION AND CULTURE

An interdisciplinary exploration of the Iberian Peninsula’s civilizations and cultures as reflected in its history, literature, peoples, politics, and arts. Topics range from Spanish Unification in 1492 through the rise and fall of Spain as an imperial power. Class/laboratory.
Prerequisite: Spanish 211, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor.

SPAN 304 EARLY SPANISH AMERICAN CIVILIZATION AND CULTURE

An interdisciplinary exploration of civilizations and cultures from the colonial period through the early 20th-century as reflected in its history, literature, peoples, politics, and arts. Class/laboratory (1/2 course).
Prerequisite: Spanish 211, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor.

SPAN 310 SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE I

An introduction to the literature of Spain from the Middle Ages through the seventeenth century, from the story of the Cid through the myth of Don Juan. Class/laboratory.
Prerequisite: Spanish 211, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor.

SPAN 317 SURVEY OF COLONIAL LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE I

An introduction to the literature of Spanish America, from the 16th to the early 20th century, emphasizing the literary response to the peoples and places of the New World, the transformation of Spain’s literary legacy, the rise of national traditions after independence, and the modernistas’ answer to regionalism. Class/laboratory.
Prerequisite: Spanish 211, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor.

SPAN 421 SEMINAR IN THE LITERATURE AND CULTURE OF THE NEW WORLD

An in-depth study of the influence of colonial literature in both the formation of a Latin American identity and the development of contemporary writing. Texts by the explorers, missionaries, and conquistadores in the New World (including Columbus, Friar Bartolomé de las Casas, Hernán Cortés), and the subsequent generations of “American-born” writers (such as “The Inca” Garcilaso de la Vega). May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Class/laboratory. [W]
Prerequisite: Spanish 304 or 317, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor.

SPAN 423 SEMINAR IN EARLY MODERN SPANISH LITERATURE AND CULTURE

An in-depth study of a literary theme, author, or genre related to Spain during the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Emphasizing the cultural contexts, examples of topics include transvestite comedy, the short prose of Cervantes, the Spanish Inquisition, or Neo-Baroque themes and imagery in contemporary film and literature. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Class/laboratory. [W]
Prerequisite: Spanish 303 or 310, equivalent proficiency.

SPAN 425 DON QUIXOTE

Cervantes’ masterpiece as it relates to today’s reader, its impact on contemporary culture, and the stylistic innovations that make this novel a modern classic. Required of all majors in Spanish. Class/laboratory.
Prerequisite: One survey course in Hispanic literature, equivalent proficiency, or permission of the instructor.